Domestic Homicide Review report published

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The Domestic Homicide Review Panel report into the murder of a 35-year-old mother of two, by her husband of eight years, has concluded that her death ‘could not reasonably have been foreseen or prevented by any agency, organisation or individual.’

The Epping Forest Community Safety Partnership has published the Domestic Homicide Review Panel Report into the tragic murder of Susan, a 35 year old mother of two from Theydon Bois. Her husband Peter assaulted her in February 2016 and set fire to her body in an attempt to conceal the murder.

What is a DHR?

The Domestic Homicide Review (DHR) process considers the circumstances that led to death from violence, abuse or neglect by a relation, partner or ex-partner of a member of the same household.

DHR’s establish whether public bodies and agencies could improve responses to situations, whether the correct safeguards are in place, identify lessons learned and highlight best practice – in order to prevent similar tragedies from happening in the future.

Absolute tragedy

Epping Forest District Council participated in the review. The Council’s Portfolio Holder for Community Safety, Councillor Sam Kane said: “Susan’s death was an absolute tragedy. On behalf of myself and everyone on the panel, I would like to extend our condolences to everyone affected by her death, especially her children and loved ones.”

“The exact reasons for the murder were not uncovered but the report discloses an order of events and Peter’s subtle coercive and controlling behaviours that may have contributed to the unexpected attack.”

Subtle abuse

“The panel’s view was that irrespective of whether outreach services were available to Susan, it was unlikely that she, her family and friends would have recognised her need for access to them, because the domestic abuse she received was so subtle. This is indicative of the widening definition of domestic abuse. Domestic abuse is far more than physical. It can take many forms that are not as obvious as broken bones or bruising.

“The report highlights the importance of health professionals in recognising potential domestic abuse through interactions with patients with non-physical symptoms such as low self-esteem or depression”.

Report concerns before it’s too late

Councillor Kane concluded: “If you or someone you know could be a victim, you can report your concerns anonymously to the police or to social services. Do not turn a blind eye. Your call could make the difference between life and death.”

J9 initiative

A team of agencies; Essex Police, Essex County Council Social Services, Safer Places and Epping Forest District Council, work together to form the Epping Forest Community Safety Partnership. Together they combat and raise awareness of Domestic Abuse under the initiative ‘J9’, set up in memory of domestic abuse victim Janine Mundy.

Visit the Southend, Essex and Thurrock Domestic Abuse Board (SETDAB) website for comprehensive advice and guidance on how to get help https://setdab.org/victims/

Further contact infomation

  • Police – 999 (if danger is immediate)
  • Police – 101 (non-emergencies)
  • Safer Places 24 hour helpline – 03301 025811
  • National domestic violence 24 hour helpline 0808 2000 247

Floods Destroy – Are you at Risk? Are you Prepared?

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With the onset of winter, the Environment Agency has launched its annual Flood Action Campaign.

This year it’s titled Prepare, Act, Survive and is aimed at young people who are most at risk in a flood because18-24’s are least aware of dangers of flooding in their area and more than half would not know what to do in an emergency. The Environment Agency and British Red Cross are urging young people to learn how to protect themselves and help their communities when flooding hits.

Self-help

“We are all individually responsible for the safety of ourselves, and our homes in the event of a flood,” said Cllr Nigel Avey, Cabinet Member for the Environment.

“There is so much self-help information available that there is no excuse for not being prepared in the event of a flood.”

“For instance flood doors and boards are available to hold back the water if you live in an area that is in danger of flooding, or you can buy self-inflating ‘sandbags’ that only take up a fraction of the space of traditional sandbags and can be deployed rapidly. We must all be prepared to help ourselves should the worst happen.”

I would also encourage all residents to check the flood risk in their area by visiting the Environment Agency’s website and if necessary sign up for automated email and text Flood Alerts.

Be prepared

The Environment Agency’s advice in their latest campaign is to:

Prepare a bag that includes medicines and insurance documents

Act, turn off gas, water and electricity. Move things upstairs or to safety. Move family, pets and car to safety

Survive Call 999 if in immediate danger, follow advice from emergency services, keep yourself and your family safe.

More useful information is available on:

https://www.gov.uk/check-flood-risk

http://www.essexprepared.co.uk/

http://bluepages.org.uk/

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/environment-agency

#JustOneThing on YouTube

You wouldn’t leave your belongings out to be stolen, so why let them be taken by a flood? What #JustOneThing would you hate to lose in a flood?

Paying for policing, Roger Hirst needs your opinion

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Do you want to see an improved Police Service in Essex? And are you willing to pay more Council Tax to provide it? Those are the questions being asked by Roger Hirst, the Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner for Essex.

Essex residents are being asked to fill in a survey so Mr Hirst can see what the county’s opinion is on increasing resources for Essex Police. He also wants to know what they think about the policing priorities for Essex.

Police funding

Funding for Essex Police comes from two sources – central Government and local Council Tax. Taking these two funding sources into account, Essex Police receives the second lowest funding per resident of any police force in the country and has one of the lowest Council Tax precepts for policing. Next year we are also expecting significant additional costs from increases in police officer pay, higher insurance costs and changes to police officer pensions.

There will also be costs as a result of extending the police’s Airwave radio system due to delays in the roll out of the National Emergency Services Communication Programme.

Tell the Police what you think

Roger Hirst, Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner for Essex, said: “I want to provide the best possible policing service, which is what the people of Essex rightly deserve. Increasing investment will help the Chief Constable deliver this. I am working hard to lobby the Government but we cannot yet know the scale of any increase in central Government funding.  I can of course raise the policing precept. Before I do that I want to know what people think.”

5,000 responses to last survey

Last year, Mr Hirst carried out a similar survey which received more than 5,000 responses. Approximately two thirds of the people who answered (65 per cent) said they would be prepared to see the police element of local Council Tax increased by more than two per cent so more money could be made available for policing in Essex. More than half were prepared to pay up to £20 more per year.

Additional officers by Feb 2019

Mr Hirst said: “In light of the results from last year’s survey, I raised the policing element of the Council Tax by up to £12, or £1 a month for a Band D property. This increase, as part of the £450 million in police funding secured nationally from the Government last year, allowed Essex Police to recruit 150 more frontline officers, bringing the total amount of Essex Police officers to at least 3,000. These additional officers are being recruited and trained and will be arriving in local communities by February 2019.”

He added: “Whilst filling the survey I would also like people to give their views on the policing priorities for Essex. I want to make sure that they reflect the needs of the communities that Essex Police serves.”

Complete the survey

People can fill in the survey online via this link http://www.essex.pfcc.police.uk/policing-precept-survey-2018/

The survey will be live from 1am on Tuesday, November 6 and will close at midnight on Tuesday, November 27.

Further information

Hard copies are also available on request.  Please contact the Office of the Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner on 01245 291600 if you would like a copy or you can email pfcc@essex.pnn.police.uk

You can also write to PFCC for Essex, Kelvedon Park, London Road, Rivenhall, Witham, Essex, CM8 3HB.

The Band D Council Tax for policing in Essex for 2018/19 is £169.02 per year.

This is not a referendum, it is an opportunity to gauge opinions so those views can be taken into account as part of the decision making process. The survey only reflects the policing element of the Council Tax precept and not the precept relating to Essex County Fire and Rescue Service.

Drug raid action across district

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Updated information – 15 November 2018

Eighteen people appeared in court yesterday morning and faced drug-related charges following a day of action across Epping Forest District.

The 18 were arrested on Tuesday 13 November, following the execution of warrants in Debden, Loughton, Buckhurst Hill, Chigwell, Limes Farm and Hainault.

They appeared at Chelmsford Magistrates’ Court yesterday, Wednesday November 14, to face the charges.

They are

  • A 17-year-old from Ilford was charged with conspiring to supply a Class A drug.
  • Junior Lawrence, 19, of New Road, Hainault was charged with conspiring to supply a Class A drug.
  • Zaclee Purcell-Matthews, 27, of Brocket Way, Redbridge was charged with conspiring to supply a Class A drug.
  • A 17-year-old boy from Ilford was charged with conspiring to supply a Class A drug.
  • James Jackson, 19, of Robinia Close, Hainault was charged with supplying a Class A drug.
  • Cameron Morrison, 18, of Copperfield, Chigwell was charged with conspiring to supply a Class A drug.
  • A 17-year-old from Murtwell Drive, Chigwell was charged with conspiring to supply A Class A drug.
  • Jamie Jacobson, 27, of Tylers Close, Loughton was charged with supplying a Class A drug.
  • Hakeem Hearne, 22 of Queens Road, Buckhurst Hill, was charged with supplying a Class A drug.
  • Reece Phinn, 20, of St Francis Way, Ilford was charged with four counts of supplying a Class A drug.
  • Chad Morris, 20, of The Mile End, Walthamstow was charged with three counts of supplying a Class A drug.
  • Glen O’Brien, 48 of The Plain, Epping was charged with supplying a Class A drug.
  • Tom King, 37 of Colson Road, Loughton was charged with supplying a Class A drug.
  • Barry Gilbody, 48, of Paley Gardens, Loughton was charged with supplying a Class A drug.
  • Robert White, 32 of New North Road, Ilford was charged with supplying a Class A drug.
  • Joel Young, 22 of Elmsdale Road, Walthamstow was charged with possession with intent to supply Cannabis.
  • A 17-year-old boy from Buckhurst Hill was charged with possession of cannabis.
  • Tommy Shatford, 19, of Tylers Close, Loughton was charged with being concerned in the supply of Class A drugs.

A further six people, also arrested, have been released under investigation.

 

Spreading the word about Gateway drugs

Written on . Posted in Buckhurst Hill, Chairman, Chigwell, Community, Councillors, Crime and safety, Epping, Health, Loughton, Older people, Ongar, Our activities, Out and about, Residents, Waltham Abbey, Young people, Your area, Your community, Your environment

A three month advertising campaign on the back of local buses has been helping to raise awareness of Epping Forest Youth Council’s anti-drugs messages.

‘Say no to Gateway Drugs’ was the theme of the advertisement – urging young people not to start down a road that could lead to a hard drug habit.

The decision to champion the anti-drugs message came after a clean up of car parks across the district revealed over 500 ‘laughing gas’ cannisters.

Cllr Helen Kane, Portfolio Holder for Leisure & Community Services said: “It is important young people understand the serious health risks the substance can pose. Nitrous oxide can be very dangerous when misused.”

The design of the bus poster was created by Youth Councillor Annabelle Yaman called ‘Don’t Open the Gate to Gateway Drugs’. The campaign ran from August to the end of October on Arriva buses across the Epping Forest district.

Youth Councillor ‘Stanimir Bakalov’ said: “The amount of canisters we found whilst out and about is worrying and it shows ‘laughing gas’ is a real issue for young people today. Through our drug awareness project we hope to highlight the risks and make young people aware of the damage they are doing.”

Advice Day on how to stamp out rural crime

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Nearly one third of all crime reported across Essex is rural. As part of a county-wide campaign to raise awareness and stamp out rural crime Essex Police is holding a Rural Crime Advice Day, on Wednesday 14th November 10.00am – 3pm at Slamseys Farm, Blackley Lane, Great Notley, CM77 7QW

This will the fifth event of its kind and showcases products and services covering farms, businesses and communities in the countryside.

Campaign

Machinery, tractors, plant, metals, diesel, quad bikes, tools, vehicles, caravans, trailers, equine tack, dwellings, barns, stables, and outbuildings are popular targets for criminals so there will be advice available on how to protect them.

The advice day is part of a campaign targeting hotspots across the county using social media, posters and leaflets.

For more information about rural crime please visit www.essex.police.uk/rural

Council 1 November 2018

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Reports to Council on 1 November 2018 included updates on the newly completed Leisure Centre in Waltham Abbey, an Essex-wide fly-tipping campaign, additional Council homes built and an announcement about free weekend parking in Council run car parks in December.

Leisure Centre open ahead of schedule

It’s good news for Waltham Abbey, with the new Leisure Centre set to open ahead of schedule on Saturday 17 November 2018.

The new health and wellbeing hub boasts a six lane 25m pool along with a 15m learner pool with floor that is adjustable between 0m and 1.2m, virtual cycling classes and state of the art equipment.

Leisure partners Places for People are offering memberships with no joining fee until 14 November 2018.

Crime not to Care

The Council has been promoting the Essex-wide fly-tipping campaign, ‘Crime not to Care’.

Designed to educate residents about their duty of care when disposing of their waste, the campaign informs residents that they can be fined and prosecuted if their waste is fly-tipped by rogue traders.

In his report, Councillor Nigel Avey, Environment Portfolio Holder, informed members of the Councils most recent prosecution. The case of Loughton resident, Mr Tjoluskins, was heard by Magistrates on 13 September. He handed his waste to a scammer who fly-tipped in a bin store in Oakley Court in Loughton. The resident was fined £600 and ordered to pay the Councils prosecution costs of £900.

The campaigns message is simple – before handing over your waste to somebody else, always check, consider and record to protect yourself and reduce fly-tipping by rogue traders.

Universal Credit

In his report to members, Councillor Mohindra, Finance Portfolio Holder, presented an update about Universal Credit.

From 5 December, the Job Centre Plus in Loughton will roll out Universal Credit. Meaning that anyone of working age that needs help with their rent and is not already receiving Housing Benefit, will need to apply for Universal Credit instead of Housing Benefit.

Visit www.gov.uk/universal-credit for further information.

Council house-building programme

Councillor Syd Stavrou’s report informed members of the handover of four new Council homes in Coopersale, Epping on Wednesday 10 October. The two new 2 bedroom houses and two 1 bedroom flats will be let to applicants on the Councils housing register. A further seven new Council homes will be ready to handover in early November.

The Council has committed around £58 million for new housing since it restarted its council house building programme in 2014. So far, new homes have been built in Waltham Abbey, North Weald and Epping, with more in the pipeline.

Free parking in December

Councillor Sam Kane announced the Councils plan to relax parking fees in Council owned car parks on weekends throughout December 2018 ‘to help local traders’ and support our high streets this Christmas.

Parking will be free on Saturdays and Sundays throughout December in all of the Council owned car parks.

#CrimeNotToCare campaign – it’s your responsibility!

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We spend £190,000 on clearing up fly tipping across our district…money that could be spent on other services. But did you realise that it’s not just the fly tippers that are liable to prosecution? We are all personally responsible for our waste and how it is disposed of.

Black sacks left outside the designated areas for refuse collection can constitute fly tipping as much as sofas, fridges, builders’ rubble etc, which we trust to a third party to dispose of.

Duty of care

As residents we have a duty of care to ensure our waste is disposed of responsibly and doesn’t find its way into the hands of rogue traders.

Just last month a Loughton man had to pay £1,500 in fines and costs because the person he asked to dispose of some cardboard fly tipped it. Our enforcement team traced it back to the man and he was prosecuted.

Check list

Here are a few simple checks to make before you enter into an agreement with someone to dispose of your waste:

  • Ask for their waste carrier number and vehicle details and contact the Environment Agency for a free instant waste carrier check
  • Ask for a transfer notice or receipt before your waste is taken away
  • Check where your waste is going. A legitimate waste carrier should not object to you asking these questions.
  • Make a note of who you have given your waste to, their waste carrier details and vehicle details.

You should never leave any waste such as an old washing machine or scrap metal on your drive or in the street for someone to remove. They may not be a registered waste carrier, and could take the bits they need and dump the rest.

You can donate good quality items to your local reuse organisation or charity shop , or give items to someone who could make use of them.

Further information

To find out more watch our Crime Not to Care film and please share the message to ensure your friends and family know how to protect themselves, and help us reduce fly-tipping.

Counting the cost of irresponsible waste disposal

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A Loughton resident incurred fines of more than £1,500 for not checking he was giving his waste to a reputable company.

Mr Vadims Tjoluskins of Hillyfields pleaded guilty at Chelmsford Magistrates Court last month to failing in his household waste duty of care, by giving his waste to somebody else to dispose of without carrying out the necessary checks to ensure that they were authorised by the Environment Agency to carry such waste.

Mr Tjoluskins admitted he handed over some large cardboard boxes which were later found fly tipped amongst a larger pile of waste in Oakley Court, Loughton at a bin store provided for local residents.

Magistrates fined Mr Tjoluskins £600 and ordered him to pay the Council’s prosecution costs of £900, together with a victim surcharge £60 and said that had he not pleaded guilty the fine would have been £900.

Fly tipping prosecution

“We take fly tipping, and residents’ responsibility to ensure they are disposing of their waste legitimately and responsibly very seriously,” said Cllr Nigel Avey, Portfolio Holder for Environment.

“Our message is simple: Before handing your waste to somebody else, always check, consider and record in order to protect yourself, and reduce fly-tipping by rogue traders. It is a crime not to care.”

Further information

Advice on how residents can protect themselves from rogue traders who fly-tip for profit is available on the Council’s Website. Click here for more information Crime Not to Care.

Watch a series of short films produced by the Cleaner Essex Group (a campaign group made up from representatives from local authorities across Essex), are also available to view on this web page.

Watch out for deer, the rutting season is here

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Motorists and dog walkers are being warned that the deer mating season, also known as the rutting or breeding season, has begun.

During the rutting season male deer can become highly aggressive as they attempt to fight off rivals to attract female deer. This makes them less aware of dangers around them, such as cars and bikes on the roads.

Watch out for deer the rutting season is here

Take extra care

“At this time of year its especially important for motorists to take extra care when driving through the forest and rural parts of the district” said Councillor Sam Kane, Portfolio Holder for Safer, Greener and Transport.

Accidents involving deer increase during rutting season, which lasts until late November. Deer are particularly active at dawn and dusk, which unfortunately coincides with commuting hours and the busiest times of day on our roads.

Deer are particularly active at dawn and dusk. Unfortunately this coincides with commuting hours which are often the busiest times of the day on our roads.

Wild animals can behave unpredictably

“Deer are pack animals and often move in groups, if you see one, others are likely to follow. They can appear without warning and present a greater risk than other wildlife because of their large size.”

Cllr Kane has advice for dog walkers: “Keep your dogs on a lead. Deers are wild animals and can behave unpredictably if they feel threatened, so don’t get too close.”

Be deer aware

“Please read the safety advice and be more ‘deer aware’ during this time of year” says Cllr Sam Kane, “Whether you’re driving in our district or walking in our beautiful forest, I want everyone to complete their journey safely and without incident.”