Panel appointed to advise on Harlow and Gilston Garden Town

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Eighteen planning and design experts have been appointed to advise on the development of Harlow and Gilston Garden Town.

Harlow and Gilston Garden Town

Harlow and Gilston Garden Town is an ambitious and exciting project being planned and delivered in partnership between Harlow Council, East Hertfordshire District Council and Epping Forest District Council, with support from Essex County Council and Hertfordshire County Council.

The Garden Town provides the opportunity to create fantastic new communities, delivering 16,000 new homes by 2033, with a further 7,000 new homes planned to be built beyond that.

To help to deliver the Garden Town, the councils have established a Quality Review Panel to help ensure that the Garden City principles are embedded in the development and guarantee the delivery of a high quality development.

Independent expert advice

Eighteen experts have been appointed, with a wide range of backgrounds and experience, to provide independent expert advice on the planning and design of Harlow and Gilston Garden Town. The Harlow and Gilston Garden Town Quality Review Panel will provide ‘critical friend’ advice to the planning authorities to support the delivery of high quality new places to live and work, in order to meet the needs of existing and future communities.

The panel will be chaired by Peter Maxwell, the Director of Design, London Legacy Development Corporation. Peter is an architect, town planner and urban designer with over 15 years’ senior level experience. He has led implementation of major projects in the UK, Middle East and New Zealand. He currently leads on masterplanning, architecture and public realm for redevelopment of Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. He will be joined by 17 other planning and design experts from around the country

A great opportunity to deliver the highest quality of development

Claire Hamilton Garden Town Director said: “We are delighted to have such an exceptionally high calibre of panel members who are all excited to be part of the process of planning and designing Harlow and Gilston Garden Town. This provides us with a great opportunity to deliver the highest quality of development that will provide fantastic places for people to live, work and socialize now and in the future.”

She continued “The first Quality Review Panel session will take place in May this year and I would like to wish each member of the panel a very warm welcome to the project. The panel’s wide ranging knowledge and experience will be instrumental in embedding the Garden City principles into the Garden Town and achieving the ambitious vision that the authorities have for it. This is a very exciting stage in the project and I look forward to working with the panel over the coming months and years.”

Quality Review Panel

The Quality Review Panel will begin its work in the spring of 2018 by reviewing the Spatial Vision and Design Charter for the Garden Town – and will then continue to advise the councils as they take forward their vision for Garden Town.

Review meetings, drawing on the expertise of the Quality Review Panel members, will also be available to advise the councils on strategy, masterplan and major schemes within their areas. As part of its commitment to high quality design, Epping Forest District Council has invited the Quality Review Panel to review schemes within its district and the first review will take place this month. While East Herts Council will be working with the Quality Review Panel for the Gilston Area, other schemes across its district will be reviewed by the Hertfordshire Design Review Panel.

Loughton man fined for illegal driveway

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At Chelmsford Magistrates Court on 8th February 2018 Mr Ivor Crandon of Loughton pleaded guilty after failing to comply with the requirements of a Planning Enforcement Notice served on him in July 2012.

Landscape

Failure to comply with notice

The Notice required him to remove a concrete drive from his land, 4 Ripley View Loughton.

Following an unsuccessful appeal to a planning inspector and subsequent extensions of time granted to him by the planning authority, the notice should have been complied with by 1 September 2017.

An inspection on 24 October 2017 by enforcement officers revealed that the notice had not been complied with.

Failed appeal

At an appeal in Chelmsford Crown Court on 13 April 2018 against the sentence imposed by the Magistrates on 8 February 2018 Mr Crandon was fined £2400.

He is also liable to pay the council’s prosecution costs of £508.26 and a victim surcharge of £170.

Removal of drive way

Mr Crandon stated that he is currently instructing arboriculture experts to prepare a method statement for ensuring that trees protected by tree preservation orders are not adversely affected by the removal of the driveway.

Check for planning permission

Chigwell man guilty of damaging protected tree

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At Chelmsford Magistrates Court on 5 April 2018 Mr Vinod Kumar Pandhi of Chigwell Essex pleaded guilty to causing or permitting the cutting down a hornbeam tree protected by a Tree Preservation Order (TPO).

Damaged hornbeam Chigwell

Causing damage to a protected tree

September 2017 tree and landscape officers were notified that a hornbeam tree had been cut down in the garden of 12 Tomswood Road Chigwell.

The tree was protected by a Tree Preservation Order made in 2009 and no consent had been given for the work carried out.

Failure to provide details

Interviewed under caution Mr Pandhi  stated that he was unaware that the tree was protected and believed it to be causing damage to his house, although no usual investigations had been carried out to verify this.

Mr Pandhi claimed had asked workmen carrying out work in a neighbour’s garden to cut down the tree in his property, but failed to provide details of the contactors to Epping Forest District Council to enable them to carry out further investigation, with a view to also prosecuting those directly responsible for carrying out the work.

Over £1,800 in fines

Having pleaded guilty Mr Pandhi was fined £1,000 and ordered to pay the Council’s prosecution costs of £813.73 and a victim surcharge of £100. The fine had been reduced by one third as a result of Mr Pandhi having pleaded guilty at the first hearing and took account of his current finances.

More information

For any inquiries regarding tree protection orders (TPOs) and conservation areas please contact

Harlow and Gilston Garden Town Housing and Infrastructure Fund approved

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East Herts Council, Harlow Council and Epping Forest Council are pleased that their Harlow and Gilston Garden Town Housing and Infrastructure Fund (HIF) bid has been approved by the Government to proceed to the next stage.

Landscape

The Councils have bid for funding to improve the existing River Stort crossing and provide a new river crossing in the Gilston area and also to deliver some of the sustainable transport corridor for the Harlow and Gilston Garden Town Project.

The next stage will be for us, along with Hertfordshire County Council and Essex County Council, to develop a detailed business case for this funding. This is a competitive process but we hope to be successful in bidding for HIF funding to accelerate infrastructure delivery for the Garden Town Project.

Decisions from Plans East 7 March 2018

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Planning application decisions from the Area Planning Sub-Committee East meeting Wednesday 7 March 2018.

Decisions

  • EPF/2522/17 – Walnut Barn Bushes, Wind Hill, Magdalen Laver, Ongar, CM5 0DS
    Deferred
  • EPF/2582/17 – Walnut Barn Bushes Wind Hill Magdalen Laver, Ongar, CM5 0DS
    Deferred
  • EPF/2654/17 – The Chequers, Matching Green, Matching, CM17 0PZ
    Permission refused
  • EPF/2933/17 – Maes Mawr, Stapleford Road, Stapleford Abbotts, RM4 1EJ
    Permission granted
  • EPF/3153/17 – 73 Hemnall Street, Epping, CM16 4ND
    Permission granted
  • EPF/3364/17 – Granville, 119 Theydon Park Road, Theydon Bois. CM16 7LS
    Permission refused
  • EPF/3503/17 – 38 High Road, North Weald, Epping, CM16 6BU
    Permission refused
  • EPF/0026/18 – Oak Lodge, Weald Hall Lane, Thornwood Common, Epping, CM16 6ND
    Permission refused

Planning application search

Pair found guilty of damaging protected oak trees

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Mr Mark William Wright of Abridge and Mr Danny James Swift of Romford Essex were each found guilty of causing, or permitting works to 2 oak trees protected by a Tree Preservation Order (TPO).

Damaged Oak trees Abridge

Unauthorized works

In June 2017 tree and landscape officers were notified of work that had been carried out to the branches of 2 oak trees on land adjacent to Tudor Oak 9a London Road Abridge Essex.

Officers were aware in March 2017 permission had been granted for limited work to be carried out to the trees, but upon inspection in June they found branches on both oaks had been far more excessively cut than authorized.

This ultimately caused serious damage to both trees and increases the risk of decay. No consent would have been given for the extent of the work carried out.

Further investigation  

Further investigation revealed that permitted work had been carried out to the trees in May 2017 by council contractors, who had spoken to Mr Wright at that time and informed him that the trees were the subject of a Tree Preservation Order.

When interviewed under caution both confirmed Mr Wright had employed Mr Swift to carry out the unauthorized work and that neither had checked with the council as to whether the trees were protected.

Damaged Oak trees Abridge

Over £3000 worth of fines

8 February 2018 at Chelmsford Magistrates both Mr Mark William Wright of Tudor Oak 9a London Road Abridge Essex and Mr Danny James Swift of Highfield Road Collier Row Romford Essex were each found guilty of causing or permitting works to 2 oak trees protected by a Tree Preservation Order without the authorisation of Epping Forest District Council.

Having attended court although leaving before the hearing, the Magistrates accepted that Mr Wright had intended to plead guilty and he was fined £440 for each tree and ordered that he pay a contribution towards the Council’s prosecution costs of £600.

Mr Swift was fined £660 for each tree and ordered to pay a contribution towards the Council’s prosecution costs of £600.

More information

For any inquiries regarding tree protection orders (TPOs) and conservation areas please contact

Pair fined for damaging tree

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Mrs Helen Kelly–Howe of Chingford was fined £1,850 after pleading guilty to causing or permitting unauthorised work to a tree in a conservation area.

Sycamore 10 High St

Tree within a conservation area

In June, officers were notified that branches of a sycamore tree situated within the grounds of 10 High Street Roydon had been cut back, where they overhung on to the neighbouring property at number 2 High Street.

Standing within the Roydon conservation area a 6 week notice of any intended work to the tree should have been provided. Such a notice would have revealed that consent for the extent of the works would have not been granted in any event.

No checks for consent

Further investigation revealed Mrs Helen Kelly–Howe, a director of the company owning 10 High Street instructed tree surgeon Mr John McAllister to cut the branches back to the boundary.

No checks had been made to find out if the tree was protected and neither sought consent to carry out the works undertaken.

£2,430 worth of fines

Tree surgeon Mr McAllister was fined £300 and ordered to pay a contribution of £250 towards the Council’s prosecution costs plus a victim surcharge of £30.

The Magistrates stated that Mrs Kelly-Howe had a greater role in the matter and was fined £1,000 ordered to pay a contribution of £750 towards the Council’s prosecution costs plus a victim surcharge of £100.

More information

For any inquiries regarding tree protection orders (TPOs) and conservation areas please contact

River dipping with Countrycare

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Join our Countrycare team for an exciting dip in the River Roding on Wednesday 26 July 2017. See what animals live in amongst the stones and play some exciting river games!

River Dipping

  • Date: Wednesday 26 July 2017

  • Time: 11am-1pm

  • Where: Meet in Fisherman’s car park, Roding Lane, Chigwell, IG9 6BJ

  • Cost: £3 per child (4-11 Year olds)

  • Book: 01992 564 224

You will be getting in the river with your nets so wellies are a must!

Further information

Improved Nazeing Triangle nature reserve

Written on . Posted in Community, Countrycare, Countryside and wildlife, Health, Local business, Older people, Our activities, Our attractions, Our countryside, Out and about, Residents, Trees and landscapes, Uncategorized, Waltham Abbey, Young people, Your area, Your community, Your council, Your environment, Your home

The Nazeing Triangle Nature Reserve has a brand new and accessible jetty, thanks to the hard work of Countrycare, their loyal volunteers and the Tesco, Bags of Help project.

New jetty at Nazeing Triangle LNR

Click on the photos below to begin slideshow

Habitat and access improvements

Countrycare received £8,000 in funding to help improve Nazeing triangle nature reserve’s habitat for local wildlife and provide better access for visitors.

The money was raised by the Tesco 5p carrier bag charge, which is to be used for grants to improve local parks, hold community events, support sports groups and more, in association with Groundwork – the community charity with a green heart.

Water boatmen, beetles and dragonflies

The project’s second stage was finished on Thursday 4 May 2017, following the installation of 23 pre-planted coir mats.

The mats were planted with purple loosestrife, yellow flag iris and lesser pond sedge, these will help improve the habitat around the pond edge, making it a more desirable habitat for invertebrates such as water boatmen, diving beetles and dragonflies.

Improved access

A short path leading to the jetty and a handrail alongside the boardwalk have both been installed to make the Nazeing Triangle nature reserve more accessible for everyone to enjoy.

New information panel

The final stage of the project will be the installation of a new information panel, it is hoped this will happen in the summer months.

Encouraging wildflowers

Countrycare have also given the meadow it’s yearly cut, this will help encourage wildflowers to grow and prevent coarser grasses taking over.

More information

Rutting season has begun

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Motorists, dog walkers and visitors are advised to be aware that the deer mating season, also known as the rutting season, has begun.

Wild animals (deer) road sign

Rutting season

The rutting season starts late September and peaks mid-October, during the season male deer, or bucks become less aware of their surroundings.

They can be highly aggressive as they are full of testosterone as they attempt to fight off rivals to attract as many females as possible. This makes them less aware of dangers around them, such as cars and bikes on the roads.

Be aware

Councillor Gary Waller, Portfolio Holder for Safer, Greener and Transport said: “Throughout the rutting season, drivers should take great care because there are large numbers of deer about, and sadly people have lost their lives not long ago in our area when cars collided with them at this time of year.”

“Remember that deer may be close at hand even if there aren’t trees on both sides of the road. Deer often move in groups, so if you see one, there are likely to be others following and they may leap out without warning.”

Motorists

Accidents on the roads involving deer increase at this time of year and drivers should be extra vigilant where there are deer warning signs and slow down when driving through the forest.

Dog walkers

Dogs should be kept on a lead. It is important to keep disturbance of the deer to a minimum and dog owners should be aware that deer can feel threatened by dogs and may also disrupt the deer breeding pattern.

Walkers

Walkers are advised to keep at least 50m away from deer, never get in between 2 deer and avoid feeding or photographing them at close range.